• The Alkaline Diet and Recipe for Quinoa-Lentil Salad

     

    Vegetables Stock PhotoLets be honest, much of our Western diet revolves around processed convince foods to support our “busy” lives.  But these foods can cause an acidic and anaerobic (lack of oxygen) environment in our bodies that can lead to disease and decreased immunity.  When the blood pH dips below 7.35 our body is forced to constantly use cellular energy to neutralize and detoxify the environment, instead of fighting of bugs, viruses, and fungi.

     

     

     

     

    Here are a few signs that your body is too acidic:

    • Headaches
    • Sleepiness
    • Nausea
    • Increased heart rate
    • Shortness of Breath
    • Joint pain

    The Alkalizing diet has been shown to have a positive effect on those suffering from arthritis.  Inflammation occurs in an overly acidic environment, which makes the symptoms of arthritis worse.  For more information on arthritis and Alkaline-forming diet click here.

     

    Luckily, eating by Alkaline-forming foods many of the symptoms can be reversed!  Fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds, and a few choice grains (like quinoa and millet) are Alkaline-forming foods that help your body regain balance.  Apples, Beets, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, and Kale are a few especially Alkalizing foods.  You can find a complete list of Alkaline-forming foods here!

    It can be tricky at first to work these Alkaline-forming foods into your diet.  Having foods prepped ahead of time can be helpful on busy days.  My favorite make ahead dish is Quinoa-Lentil Salad.  It keeps well in the fridge for at least 3 to 4 days, which is perfect for weekday lunches!

    Quinoa-Lentil Salad:

    1 cup uncooked Quinoa, rinsed

    1 cup uncooked french lentils, rinsed

    1/2 a Cucumber, diced

    2 medium Tomatoes, diced

    1/4 of a Red Onion, diced (optional)

    1 Red or Yellow Bell Pepper, seeded and diced

    2 Cloves of garlic, minced

    Salt and Pepper to taste

    2 Tbs Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Juice from 1/2 a Lemon

    1. Cook Quinoa: Bring quinoa and 2 cups of water to a boil, then reduce temperature and simmer on low for about 12 mins, or until all the water is absorbed.  Place cooked Quinoa in the fridge until cool.
    2. Cook Lentils: Bring lentils and 2 cups of water to a boil, the  reduce temperature and simmer on low for about 25 mins, or until all the water is absorbed.  Place cooked lentils in the fridge with the quinoa until cool.
    3. Make Dressing: While the quinoa and lentils are cooling, whisk olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, and salt and pepper together in a small container and let stand at room temperature.  This helps mellow the raw garlic.
    4. Once the quinoa and lentils are cool add in the veggies and dressing and combine.  Then pack the salad into single serving containers (I like half sized mason jars) and enjoy for lunch all week!

     

    For more information about The Alkalizing diet, click here

  • Energize Your Life


    Ashley Charlebois is a Registered Dietitian with a private consulting business based in Vancouver BC.  She specializes in sports nutrition and digestive health.  Ashley works with a variety of athletes ranging from the Vancouver Whitecaps FC, national and provincial level athletes, to individuals just starting to include more physical activity in their lives.  On the digestive health front, growing up with IBS inspired Ashley to specialize in this are to help others treat their illness an discomfort with diet.  She collaborates with gastroenterologists in the city to further improve the health of individuals with IBS, Chrohn’s disease, Ulcerative Colitis and other digestive disorders.

    This month Ashley shares her personal experience and expertise on how proper nutrition can be used to fuel your life and keep you energized through out the day.

    How to Energize Your Life

    Ever feel fatigued halfway through your workout? Feel like you want to push yourself harder but physically are just unable to? How about that mid-afternoon slump during the workday where you just can’t get anything done? It all comes down to energy levels. And guess what – diet has a huge part to play.

    Last week during the second half of an intense cycle class at the gym I was feeling… fantastic! I looked around, and it made me feel even stronger, because I seemed to be one of the few that was able to keep up with the instructor, an elite cyclist. How could this be? I am in no way an elite cyclist. Yes, I do enjoy biking, I do have a good base level of fitness, and I am determined to regularly challenge my body physically. But I hadn’t been to a cycle class for weeks before this one, yet alone started to commute daily to work by bike (that started this past week when the sun came out!). I am 100% convinced that the reason I could push hard throughout the hour long class was because of my diet. I had a pre-workout snack, yogurt and fruit, high in carbs (our primary source of fuel during moderate to intense activities) just over an hour before my workout, and healthy meals and snacks throughout the day leading up to it. This enabled me to push myself hard, keep up with the instructor, and feel great throughout my workout.

    A simple explanation for this – blood sugar levels. When we eat foods, they cause a rise in our blood sugar levels. Our food is digested and some of it (depending on what we eat) is broken down into glucose, or sugar, which gets fed into our cells and used for energy. This is what kept me going during my cycle class. This is also what keeps anyone going during everyday activities. However, when we feel hungry, tired, or just low in energy – this is when our blood sugar levels are below normal. We have no fuel in our bodies for our everyday activities. But our bodies are still functioning – how? By breaking down internal stores of fat and muscle. This in turn causes a decrease in strength and endurance during activities, and the feeling of fatigue and poor concentration at work.

    How can we avoid low energy levels and their side effects? By eating small frequent meals throughout the day. Aim to not go longer than 3 hours without eating. This will ensure energy levels are consistent throughout the day – avoiding the spikes in blood sugar or extreme lows in blood sugar, but staying somewhere in the middle, within our normal range (somewhere between about 4 – 8 mmol/L). Here’s a sketch to help you visualize:

    The effect of smaller, more frequent meals on blood sugar levels.
    What we’re eating also has a part to play. A nutritious, well-balanced diet is key. A diet rich in vegetables and fruit, whole grains, protein, and low-fat dairy products or alternatives (to provide us with calcium and vitamin D).

    Everyone is different. Depending on your schedule, your daily activities, or your sport and the intensity and duration of your training sessions – you will need to fuel your body accordingly. What and when you eat are two key things to take into consideration. If you’re an athlete, or even just engage in sport or exercise once in a while – timing, specific nutrient make-up, and size of meals and snacks depends on when you will be engaging in exercise. You want to eat something that will be digested in enough time to fuel you for your activity, but no too far in advance that you have no energy left during your activity. Sometimes it is necessary to top off your energy levels with a high carb snack during your activity, and always necessary to re-fuel with carbs and a little bit of protein after your activity.

    No matter what, DO focus on eating healthy foods throughout the day at regular intervals. Nutrition is a powerful tool that can greatly affect how you feel throughout the day, and throughout your workouts or sport!